Why QE Won't Create Inflation Quite as Expected

The unconstitutional ‘Federal’ Reserve banking cartel’s money policy is disgusting, sinister, and is destroying the U.S. economy and country. But these international banksters have ways of enriching themselves and their friends without causing massive inflation, making our currency worthless all at once — like many would expect when $Trillions are created from nothing.
According to Joel Skousen, the dollar will experience a slow death. Otherwise, too many would wake up….
We’re in the slow cooker.
jeff
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From: Charles Hugh Smith

Why QE Won’t Create Inflation Quite as Expected   (September 27, 2012)

The Fed can create money but if it doesn’t end up as household income it is “dead money.”

In the consensus view, the Federal Reserve’s unlimited quantitative easing (QE3) programs will do two things: 1) boost stocks and other “risk on” assets and 2) generate inflation. The two follow-on effects are related, of course; gold and other hard assets are rising in anticipation of higher inflation.

But all is not quite as it seems when it comes to the inflationary effect of creating money. I’m going to cover a lot of ground here so buckle up and grab your favorite stimulating beverage.

Let’s use some examples to illustrate key features of the relationship between money creation and inflation. Let’s say a central bank prints $1 trillion in cash currency, digs a big hole and buries it. Does that $1 trillion in new money cause inflation? No, because it never got into the hands of people who might trade it for goods and services in the real world.

Recall that the premise of monetary inflation is straightforward supply and demand: when money is abundant and goods are scarce, the price of goods rises as abundant demand (everybody has lots of cash or credit) meets limited supply (limited oil, gold, grain, etc.) in an open marketplace.

Let’s say the Fed electronically creates $1 trillion and metaphorically buries it in some account where it sits as “dead money.” It cannot trigger inflation because it isn’t reaching the hands of people who might use it to buy scarce goods and services.

Let’s also recall that money is destroyed, not just created, when assets fall in value and bad debt is written down. Consider a house purchased for $350,000 at the top of the real estate bubble with a $50,000 cash down payment and a $300,000 mortgage. The owner defaults and the house is sold for $150,000. The $50,000 down payment was cash; it was not “on paper.” It has not been transferred to someone else; it has vanished.

The same can be said of the $150,000 the bank lost on the mortgage. The bank’s cash reserves (capital) take a $150,000 hit. That was real money, too, and it wasn’t transferred to someone else; it disappeared. Thus $200,000 of real money has been destroyed.

To the degree that immense overhangs of bad debt are slowly being written off, money is being destroyed. If the Fed “prints” $500 billion a year, and write-downs erase $500 billion, the money supply hasn’t expanded at all.

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