Pagan Serpent Rod of Asclepius – Symbol of American Medical Association — Original Hippocratic Oath: “I swear by Apollo the healer and by *Asclepius* and by Hygieia and Panacea and by all the gods”

In Greek mythology, the Rod of *Asclepius*… is a serpent-entwined rod wielded by the Greek god Asclepius, a deity associated with healing and medicine.

The original Hippocratic Oath began with the invocation “I swear by Apollo the Healer and by *Asclepius* and by Hygieia and Panacea and by all the gods …”

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Rod of Asclepius

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

In Greek mythology, the Rod of Asclepius (Greek: Ράβδος του Ασκληπιού, Rábdos tou Asklipioú, sometimes also spelled Asklepios), also known as the Staff of Aesculapius and as the asklepian,[1] is a serpent-entwined rod wielded by the Greek god Asclepius, a deity associated with healing and medicine. The symbol has continued to be used in modern times, where it is associated with medicine and health care, yet frequently confused with the staff of the god Hermes, the caduceus. Theories have been proposed about the Greek origin of the symbol and its implications.

The Rod of Asclepius takes its name from the Greek god Asclepius, a deity associated with healing and medicinal arts in Greek mythology. Asclepius’ attributes, the snake and the staff, sometimes depicted separately in antiquity, are combined in this symbol.[2] Continue reading “Pagan Serpent Rod of Asclepius – Symbol of American Medical Association — Original Hippocratic Oath: “I swear by Apollo the healer and by *Asclepius* and by Hygieia and Panacea and by all the gods””