Ron Paul on Real Time with Bill Maher 2/20/09 — “The real problem is we need to do a lot less”

Too bad Bill Maher didn’t have Ron Paul on during the media blackout of his Presidential campaign. Paul could have saved America from this mess had only America listened, then.

Transcribed by Jeff Fenske

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M5lb0l3sYBo]

“The real problem is we need to do a lot less.”

The real cause is created by the ‘Federal’ Reserve,
and yet very few people are talking about the ‘Federal’ Reserve.”
[Hmmm. Why is that? Maher won’t touch it either – ed.]

In the ’30s, they said
capitalism and the gold standard caused our problems.
It was an absolute falsehood.
It was the ‘Federal’ Reserve
and government intervention
that caused it.”

“You can’t keep printing money.”

“We’re spending 1 Trillion dollars
on maintenance of our overseas empire.”

“I believe in freedom of choice in all that we do
as long as the individual never hurts anybody else.”

Mr. Freedom, himself,
Congressman Ron Paul

Related: AMAZING!!! Historians Twist History of the Great Depression(s) to Make Gov’t Intervention Appear Desirable

Rape in the Congo: The Gruesome Picture

From: United States Senate Committee on the Judiciary

Testimony of Lisa F. Jackson Documentary Maker and Director of “The Greatest Silence: Rape in the Congo”
Before the Subcommittee on Human Rights and the Law Committee on the Judiciary United States Senate

“Rape as a Weapon of War: Accountability for Sexual Violence in Conflict”
April 1, 2008

Chairman Durbin, Ranking Member Coburn, and Members of the Subcommittee, I am honored to be asked to come before you to describe from my own perspective some of what I witnessed and heard in the months that I spent in the Eastern DR Congo in 2006 and 2007 shooting a documentary film. During that time I interviewed many women and girls who had survived sexual violence. I talked with peacekeepers, priests, doctors, activists, international aid workers and, most chillingly of all, with a dozen self-confessed rapists, uniformed soldiers in the Congolese army who boasted to my camera about the dozens of women they had raped. What I heard in the Congo has altered the course of my own life, and I hope I can convey to you here today even a small sense of the profound impact that the women – and men -of the Congo had on me. Continue reading “Rape in the Congo: The Gruesome Picture”