Health Hazards From Jet Fumes Extend Many Miles From Airports

Both Articles From: Alliance of Residents Concerning O’Hare (AReCO)

Noise, as millions are all too aware, is a serious physiological and psychological health hazard. It is readily apparent when it intrudes on conversation, listening pleasure or interferes with sleep and education. Government-designated 24-four hour “average noise levels” ignore single, sudden events offering false measurement of actual impacts and grossly underestimating the number of people affected. Inaudible low-frequency and high frequency sound waves, about which little is known, also probably contribute to adverse health affects.

Harmful as noise may be, its effects may be minor when the products of jet engine exhaust and other airport sources are considered. I, and other members of the Alliance of Residents Concerning O’Hare (AReCO) and our recently organized national organization, US-Citizens Aviation Watch (US-CAW), with the Natural Resources Defense Council have come upon much interesting information about airport and aircraft operations, which produce massive amounts of hazardous and toxic emissions.

Here is just a partial, astonishing list of constituent compounds: Freon 11; Freon 12; Methyl Bromide; Dichloromethane; cis-l,2-Dichloroethylene; 1,1,1-Trichloroethane; Carbon Tetrachloride; Benzene; Trichloroethylene; Toluene; Tetrachloroethene; Ethylbenzene; m,p-Xylene; o-Xylene; Styrene; 1,3,5-Trimethylbenzene; 1,2,4-Trimethylbenzene; o-Dichlorobenzene; Formaldehyde; Acetaldehyde; Acrolein; Acetone; Propinaldehyde; Crotonaldehyde; Isobutylaldehyde; Methyl Ethyl Ketone; Benzaldehyde; Veraldehyde; Hexanaldehyde; Ethyl Alcohol; Acetone; Isopropyl Alcohol; Methyl Ethyl Ketone; Butane; Isopentane; Pentane; Hexane; Butyl Alcohol; Methyl Isobutyl Ketone; n,n-Dimethyl Acetamide; Dimethyl Disulfide; m-Cresol; 4-Ethyl Toulene; n- Heptaldehyde; Octanal; 1,4-Dioxane; Methyl Phenyl Ketone; Vinyl Acetate; Heptane; Phenol; Octane; Anthracene; Dimethylnapthalene(isomers); Flouranthene; 1-methylnaphthalene; 2-methylnaphthalene; Naphthalene; Phenanthrene; Pyrene; Benzo(a)pyrene; 1-nitropyrene; 1,8-dinitropyrene; 1,3-Butadiene; sulfites; nitrites; nitrogen oxide; nitrogen monoxide; nitrogen dioxide; nitrogen trioxide; nitric acid; sulfur oxides; sulfur dioxide; sulfuric acid; urea; ammonia; carbon monoxide; ozone; particulate matter (PM10, PM2.5); and finally this compound; 3-nitrobenzanthrone.*

According to chemist Hitomi Suzuki of Kyoto University, the last compound, 3-nitrobenzanthrone, may be the most hazardous compound ever to be tested for carcinogenicity….

Think, too, you do not have to be an immediate airport neighbor. That pollution is shed over an enormous area surrounding a busy airport, diminishing, of course, in a radius of at least 24 miles and from an elevation of about 3500 feet to the ground.

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What symptoms can occur with prolonged exposure to these chemicals?

ASPHYXIATION
ASTHMA
BRAIN CANCER
CANCER
CONJUNCTIVE IRRITATION
COUGHING
DELAYED HYPERSENSITIVITY
DISTORTED PERCEPTIONS
DROWSINESS
DYSPNEA HEADACHE
EEG CHANGES
EMPHYSEMA
FLUSHING
HALLUCINATIONS
HEART DISEASE
HODGKIN’S DISEASE
KIDNEY DAMAGE
LACRIMATION
LIVER DAMAGE
LUNG DISEASE
LUNG STRUCTURE DAMAGE
LUNG TIGHTNESS
LYMPHOMA
MENTAL DEPRESSION
MULTIPLE ORGAN INVOLVEMENT
MUSCLE WEAKNESS
MUTATIONS
MYELOID LEUKEMIA
NASAL EFFECTS
NAUSEA, VOMITING
PULSE RATE DECREASE
PULMONARY IRRITATION
RESPIRATORY SYSTEM DAMAGE
SKIN AND EYE IRRITATION
SYSTEMIC IRRITATION
TUMORS
WHEEZING

Click here for a list of research material cited above.

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4 thoughts on “Health Hazards From Jet Fumes Extend Many Miles From Airports

  1. Shelly

    I have been living under a flyway within 5 miles of a busy airport for just over 1 year and I am already suffering with lung problems. My fiancee has lived here for 5 years and he suffers with chronic cough which the Drs are trying to tell him is because of acid reflux.
    Now that I’ve read this article, I can’t get away from here fast enough. My lungs feel like I have been smoking 2 packs of cigarettes a day. I’m a non smoker (quit 10 years ago)

  2. Jeff Fenske

    Shelly,

    It is good to get out of there. There are things you can do in the meantime, however.

    I’ve worked at airports for 30 years, often directly in the line of fire. But it looks like I’m going to have to get a different job soon, because our new owner is grounding our freighters.

    Many of the antioxidants seem to help: selenium (in brewer’s yeast. I take a lot), beer, wine, grapes with seeds, freshly made coffee, Barry’s Gold Blend tea, vitamin C, vitamin E, dark chocolate, chlorella, etc..

    There is a lot of nasty stuff in that jet fuel. If you move, watch out for EMF too. Cell phone towers are particularly bad.

    jeff

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