Captain Kirk’s Predecessor: Star Trek Was RAND Corporation Predictive Programming

Captain Kirk’s Predecessor: Star Trek Was RAND Corporation Predictive Programming

Jurriaan Maessen
Infowars.com
January 21, 2013

In a rare and recently unearthed interview from 1965, the actor who preceded William Shatner as first captain of the Enterprise, stated that the series was based on the RAND Corporation’s “projection of things to come”.

Actor Jeffrey Hunter, who played captain Christopher Pike in the Star Trek pilot “The Cage” told a Hollywood columnist in January of ’65 that he hoped the pilot-episode would be picked up as a series because he was intrigued by the fact that the series was based on the RAND corporation’s “projection of things to come.” …

“The things that intrigues me the most”, Hunter said, “is that it is actually based on the Rand Corporation’s projection of things to come. Except for the fictional characters, it will be like getting a look into the future and some of the predictions will surely come true in our lifetime.”…

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qp6AfEn2Bcg]

Harvey Lynn’s role as a “technical adviser” is only part of this story. Notions such as “world government”, and a “federation of planets” are of course embedded within the series, as Gene Roddenberry’s vision was oriented towards a global society striving for “peace”. Of course to get his project launched, Roddenberry had to tolerate certain alterations and adjustments on the insistence of his benefactors. In retrospect it’s perfectly understandable that intelligence agencies had a more than average interest in the series. What better way to gradually introduce people to the concept of world government as a natural step in the evolution of things than through science-fiction. After all, the genre provides screenwriters a key to imaginative Valhalla- at the same time allowing RAND’s social engineers the perfect format for weaving its desired world government patterns into.

As Daniel Brandt wrote in his article Philanthropists at War, the interlocking system of “foundations” and think tanks after WWII were part of the push by central banks to establish, by stealth, a one world government. And this global system of control, as Carroll Quigley brought to light in his Tragedy and Hope, would not be some idealized “let’s all come together in peace” sort of political utopia. Rather this thousand-headed creature was forced into being and controlled by the major central banks on the planet acting in concert. Quigley, by the way, described the RAND corporation as “a private research and development firm, under contract to the United States Air Force.” Brandt wrote:

“Covert foreign policy became the standard mode of operation after World War II, which was also when Ford Foundation became a major player for the first time. The institute most involved in classified research was Rand Corporation, set up by the Air Force in 1948. The interlocks between the trustees at Rand, and the Ford, Rockefeller, and Carnegie foundations were so numerous that the Reece Committee listed them in its report (two each for Carnegie and Rockefeller, and three for Ford). Ford gave one million dollars to Rand in 1952 alone, at a time when the chairman of Rand was simultaneously the president of Ford Foundation.”

The involvement of RAND in Star Trek is presumably far from an isolated experiment. In a July 26 2011 article by Daniel Taylor of Oldthinkernews, the author writes about a trailer for the video game Deus Ex: Human Revolution, getting the people ready for a transhumanist future in which man merges with machine.Taylor points to a report prepared by RAND for the National Intelligence Council titled The Global Technology Revolution. In this 2001 report these themes are outlined as “possibilities”. These “possibilities” then magically find their way into fictional formats such as movies and video-games.

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